Can LPR be Caused by Anxiety?

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can lpr be caused by anxiety

When it comes to LPR (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux) there are a host of causes and symptoms associated with it. Though is LPR caused by stress or anxiety? Well it’s one of the causes that is not often talked about it the correlation between LPR and stress, anxiety and depression.

LPR & Anxiety – Correlated?

There is a strong correlation between people who have LPR and psychological symptoms like anxiety and stress, with anxiety being the most common association. Also there have been studies which prove this both for people with LPR (silent reflux) and also people with GERD and more typical acid reflux symptoms.

When I think back to when I myself first started having the symptoms of LPR I was highly stressed and generally speaking I was quite a nervous person who had quite some anxiety. Of course, if you have a host of LPR symptoms anxiety could be the cause of it and the LPR and general bad health could make your anxiety worse just by simply worrying about your health like happened to me initially.

When I first had problems with my throat I wasn’t aware I had LPR though further down the road I figured out that was what was affecting me. Once I got to that stage I did all of the best proven LPR treatment and it definitely helped me. Though I feel my mindset change and addressing my anxiety, stress etc. was an extremely important element for me to go that extra step. Not only for me personally as someone who had nervous tendencies and anxiety, but it seems for a lot of others who suffer from LPR also have these tendencies.

I have read a lot of posts from people suffering from it everyday and it’s clear to me there seems to be a relation between stress, anxiety and depression with LPR. Of course, this could be how the person was before they developed LPR or this could be because of the havoc that LPR can cause to someone which can amplify these problems.

Don’t just take my word for it, there was a study done to see if there is any relationship between LPR and depression. The result of this study showed a significant association between the depression and LPR. You can check this study here.

If you have LPR, I would suggest you not only treat LPR as I have suggested in my complete LPR guide but also treat and address any of these problems alongside it to get the best effect possible.

My Advice for Helping Anxiety, Stress, Depression etc.

For me personally one of the things that really helped me was reading this book called “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living”. This book is excellent at teaching you effective ways to stop worrying which for me was one of my main problems. I could be worrying and anxious about a host of different things – it could be my health at the time or it could be me attending an interview for a job.

The important thing to mention was that me worrying caused me to be more nervous and anxious which undoubtedly negatively effected my digestion and in turn worsened my LPR symptoms. The advice in the book really helped me with properly tackling my mentality and general logic when getting anxious or stressed about something.

One of the important things I learnt from that book was to think more logically about things. When I say this, I mean for example if you have a health problem in this case LPR I would think about what’s causing and what you can do to make it better. Then I would make a step by step plan to make it better and write it down on paper to help emphasize it in your brain. Another thing to think of logically is to not get stressed over silly things like attending an interview. Before when I attended a job interview I would get very nervous but now I think about it more logically and I say to myself why I am getting anxious – I am simply just talking to other regular people – there is nothing to be anxious about!

Another thing I picked up was to focus on today. What that basically means to not to worry about what might happen tomorrow or what happened yesterday. Just live for today. This is great I feel if you are suffering with LPR. I myself had a plan to help my LPR and I did that every day. I was thinking that I am positively doing my best today to help myself and that was a great way for me to ease my mind and help me relax and stop worrying.

One final thing I want to mention is having faith. When I say having faith I mean thinking that you can do something. Someone who believes they can do something is much more likely to do it. The same applies to someone who thinks they can’t, because they almost certainly won’t be able to do it.

How this applied to me was before I had a more negative mindset when I didn’t have much faith in myself getting better after dealing with LPR for almost 2 years. This negative mindset was holding me back from improving my health. By me changing my mindset to one where I thought more positively by thinking that I will get better, I believe was an important step for me to lower my anxiety, stress and depression. This in turn undoubtedly helped with lessening my LPR symptoms and allowing for me to get on the right path to curing my LPR.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can LPR be Caused By Stress?

Yes, LPR can be caused by stress and it has been shown that things like stress and anxiety can worsen and even cause acid reflux in the first place.

How Long Does it Take for LPR to Heal?

There is not a one size fits all answer for this. For some people they can return to normal after 1-2-weeks’ time whereas for others they must maintain a strict diet for many months until they can heal. Also, not everyone may be able to completely heal though luckily the vast majority of people will see improvements when doing things like following a strict low acid diet.

How Do You Treat LPR?

There are lots of ways that can help treat LPR but the best 2 things you can do are firstly following a low acid diet that avoids trigger foods. Secondly the best medicine to help LPR is Gaviscon Advance (UK version), it has been proven to be effective at helping LPR unlike other more commonly prescribed medicines like PPI’s which tend to be largely ineffective for treating LPR.

How Do You Test for LPR?

The best singular test to test for LPR is by doing a Restech pH study sometimes called a Dx-pH System. This is similar to the likes of a normal pH study though the important difference is that it is much better at detecting gaseous reflux than other pH studies. This is very important because LPR reflux is gaseous reflux unlike normal acid reflux which is primarily liquid based reflux. For this test a thin tube is inserted up the nose and down the throat and left for 24 hours where it will measure the acidity of your throat and esophagus.

8 COMMENTS

  1. I have had LPR for three years and have tried all diets ie Gluten free, no dairy, no coffee. Ihave tried many nose drops and omeprazole. Non of these made any difference. I have come to tne conclusion that I do have nasal drip which occurs when I get up (when vertical). This goes at the back of my throat and I am unable to move it. When I lye down and go to bed it goes.
    The more I try and dislodge it the worse it gets. I live with it now . I had a bad headache the other day and it wqas awful had some paracetamol and it went. I thought at the time I would rather put up with my mucous.
    My son has migrianes and vomits with this. I think I am happy to put up with so called ‘LPR’

    • Hi Colin I am sorry to hear about your struggle but trust me that it can definitely be helped. I myself had a mindset like yourself after trying many diet plans and ideas myself with no success. Luckily the diet I follow now has helped me significantly and many others who have followed it as well. If you think you have LPR definitely try gaviscon advance the UK version and I would lower the PPI’s gradually if I was you. Also if you are interested in my diet plan check it out here – https://www.wipeoutreflux.com/wipeout-diet/ . If you have any other questions feel free to send me an email – david@wipeoutreflux.com

  2. Thank you so much for this post. I was diagnosed with GERD 13 years ago but have had throat problems throughout my life. I believe I have LPR as well as I get ‘gas’ reflux (Pepsin) and bile reflux. I have a sore throat, swollen glands, clear my throat a lot, sneeze a lot, have a post nasal drip and when its really bad, I get a cough as well. All signs of LPR. This really helps as the PPIs have never truly treated things for me and now I can see why

  3. I also have been struggling with lpr for almost 4 years. My issue is the horrible throat burn and sometimes pressure in my ears. Ppis don’t work for me. Actually cause chest pain probably because they stop all acid which causes gas right.
    I tried diet and felt pretty good but started my coffee intake again and feel shitty again.

    • Oh sorry to hear that, it’s good that the diet was helping you. At least you know that it was the coffee that triggered it and you can avoid that from now on. Try Chicory it shouldn’t trigger symptoms and is somewhat like coffee!

  4. Hello.
    I’ve come across this site after searching my symptoms. I have a constant lump at the back of my throat, I sometimes taste vomit when I belch and I have a sore throat that comes and goes. My Dr thinks it’s all anxiety as I suffer for anxiety quite bad, especially around health. I’m also a type 1 diabetic but don’t think it’s anything linked to that. I’m worried that the LPR (if that’s what I have) could be caused by cancer or is it just another symptom of my day to day anxiety? So glad I’ve found this website.

    • Hey Helen thank you for the kind comments. I don’t think it’s caused by cancer at all though your anxiety will likely make your symptoms worse. It’s not all anxiety though as your doctor has said, it’s actually acid reflux causing them effects most likely. Ideally you should try and follow my advice on my site for stopping the LPR along with also trying to calm your anxiety because lessening that should also help lessen symptoms.

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